Download Arabic Sociolinguistics: Topics in Diglossia, Gender, by Reem Bassiouney PDF

By Reem Bassiouney

This advent to significant issues within the box of Arabic sociolinguistics examines key matters in diglossia, code-switching, gendered discourse, language version and alter, and language regulations. It introduces and evaluates a number of theoretical ways and versions, and it illustrates the usefulness and boundaries of those ways to Arabic with empirical facts. Reem Bassiouney explores how present sociolinguistic theories should be utilized to Arabic and, conversely, what the learn of Arabic can give a contribution to our knowing of the functionality of language in society.Graduate scholars of Arabic language and linguistics in addition to scholars of sociolinguistics without wisdom of Arabic will locate this quantity to be an integral source.

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Additional info for Arabic Sociolinguistics: Topics in Diglossia, Gender, Identity, and Politics

Example text

Many studies have shown that for most speakers, there is a prestige variety ofL, the identity of which depends on many geographica~ political and social factors within each country, and which may in certain circumstances influence speech. In Egypt, for non-Cairenes, it is the prestige variety ofEgyptian Arabic Cairene; for Jordanian women from Bedouin or rural backgrounds, on the other hand, it may be the urban dialects ofthe big cities (Abdel-Jawad 1986: 58). In a diachronic study conducted by Palva (1982), materials from Arabic dialects spoken, recorded and collected since 1914 in the Levant, Yemen, Egypt and Iraq were compared.

1994) study of Tunisian Arabic, which found that usually in switching between Tunisian Arabic and French, French nouns are inserted together with the French definite article, like l 'anemie. This is also the case in Moroccan and Algerian Arabic (cf. Boumans 1998). The following is an example from the data ofBelazi et al. (7) l' anemie fer lli yi-~a:rib c 'est le qui donne. rel 3msg-fight det-anaemia It is det-m iron rel gives. 'it's iron that gives . that fights anaemia' ( 1994: 226; Tunisian Arabic/French) In this example, French nouns have a French definite article and Arabic nouns have Arabic definite articles.

The preposition 'in' is realised differently in different dialects. ECA has a lexically different item for 'woman' from the other four varieties. There are morphological differences between TCA realisation of the first person and all the other varieties. Phonological differences are still apparent. It is noteworthy, however, that in some cases the lexical differences are not very difficult to reconcile. Thus for the verb 'to want', ECA uses fa:yiz, TCA uses n~ibb and SCA uses abga. In MSA the verb 'lahabba means 'to love'.

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