Download Conceptualizing the west in international relations by J. O'Hagan PDF

By J. O'Hagan

West is an idea familiar in diplomacy, yet we not often think of what we suggest through the time period. Conceptions of and what the West is range greatly. This e-book examines conceptions of the West drawn from writers from varied historic and highbrow contexts, revealing either attention-grabbing parallels and issues of divergence. It additionally displays on implications of those assorted perceptions of the way we comprehend the function of the West, and its interactions with different civilizational identities.

Show description

Read Online or Download Conceptualizing the west in international relations PDF

Similar international relations books

Conceptualizing the west in international relations

West is an idea familiar in diplomacy, yet we not often consider what we suggest through the time period. Conceptions of and what the West is fluctuate extensively. This publication examines conceptions of the West drawn from writers from different old and highbrow contexts, revealing either fascinating parallels and issues of divergence.

Superpower Rivalry and Conflict: The Long Shadow of the Cold War on the 21st Century

Variously defined through historians and thinkers because the ‘most poor century in Western history’, ‘a century of massacres and wars’ and the ‘most violent century in human history’, the 20 th century – and specifically the interval among the 1st international battle and the cave in of the USSR – types a coherent ancient interval which replaced the total face of human background inside of a number of a long time.

Essentials of International Relations

This ebook is disappointing.
The publication begins with, after which every one bankruptcy returns quite clunkily to, the department among liberalists, realists, radicalists, and so forth.
As in:
This is the overseas procedure. this is often how liberalists see it. .. and realists. .. and radicalists. ..
This is battle and strife. this can be how liberalists see it. .. and realists. ..
etc.
You get the belief!
This makes for a fatally uninteresting and "heavy" method of a self-discipline that may be so fascinating if dealt with thoroughly. Mingst offers scholars the impact that the total aspect of IR is making an attempt to come to a decision which of the -isms is the main legitimate.
It may were far better to take a much less theory-laden procedure within the early chapters, permitting scholars to come back up with their very own explanations/interpretations of items, after which introduce all of the -isms in later chapters.
Finally, the publication is not very basically written. greater than as soon as i used to be at a loss to give an explanation for sentences that my scholars requested me to give an explanation for.

Extra resources for Conceptualizing the west in international relations

Example text

Marx and the West For many years the perception of what constituted East and West that dominated International Relations derived from the division between the liberal capitalist system and the communist system based on Marxist thought. This is ironic since Marxism is itself derived from Western intellectual traditions. As Wallerstein points out, Marx was also a child of the Enlightenment drawing from this tradition an emphasis on the secular, and a commitment to science and reason (O’Brien, 1995; Wallerstein, 1984: 165).

From the 1950s, when the discipline began to blossom, there was an impetus towards making International Relations a truly scientific enterprise. This was signalled by Hans Morgenthau’s efforts to define International Relations as an empirical science that studied facts rather than values or aspirations (Morgenthau, 1964). As Stanley Hoffmann (1977) notes, efforts to apply instrumental reason and scientific methodology to the study of International Relations were well received in the atmosphere of the 1950s and 1960s, the era in which the behaviouralist revolution moulded the emergent social sciences.

However, the West in liberal international theory is not only an ideological alliance constituted in antithesis to the communist bloc. If it were, one would assume that the end of the Cold War and the end of the ‘East’ would have led to the dispersal of the West. However, the idea of the West continues to be employed in contemporary liberal international theory. Authors such as Francis Fukuyama (1992) refer to the West as a community of liberal, democratic states achieving relatively peaceful relations among themselves in contrast to the still developing world in which power politics still prevail.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.78 of 5 – based on 27 votes