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By Asko Parpola

Of the writing structures of the traditional global which nonetheless watch for decoding, the Indus script is crucial. It constructed within the Indus or Harappan Civilization, which flourished c. 2500-1900 BC in and round glossy Pakistan, collapsing prior to the earliest old documents of South Asia have been composed. approximately 4,000 samples of the writing continue to exist, commonly on stamp seals and amulets, yet no translations. Professor Parpola is the manager editor of the Corpus of Indus Seals and Inscriptions. His principles in regards to the script, the linguistic affinity of the Harappan language, and the character of the Indus faith are trained through a striking command of Aryan, Dravidian, and Mesopotamian assets, archaeological fabrics, and linguistic method. His interesting research confirms that the Indus script used to be logo-syllabic, and that the Indus language belonged to the Dravidian family members.

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Sample text

The Buddhist Baveru-Jataka speaks of Indian merchants who 'came to the kingdom of Baveru [fig. L I O] [and] brought a royal peacock which they had trained to scream at the snapping of the fingers and to dance at the clapping of the hands'; the Babylonians bought it for a thousand gold coins, and paid the royal peacock high honour. This Indian parallel may date from the Achaemenid times, because the name Baveru for Babylonian Btibilu may owe its r to Old Persian Btibiru. Ja bring to you tempting precious carnelian, sissoo wood of Magan, fine sea-wood (and) large boats.

This is exemplified by the fact that not a single example of the mass-produced 'goblets' with pointed ends typical of late Mohenjo-daro has been found at Nausharo III in the Kachi plain. The relative cultural uniformity of the Mature Harappan phase is gradually replaced by a variety of distinct regional cultures (see fig. r . 1 7) . The traditions of the Indus Civilization continue without a break, but are transformed by some intrusive traits. The processes of city life, such as centralized government, with the collection of taxes and organization of trade, gradually ceased to function.

Jbans, the men of the black country, brought to him all kinds of exotic wares. ' The divine � aia-bird (dba-iamufen) whose sound i s t o be heard in the royal palaces could be the peacock. The Buddhist Baveru-Jataka speaks of Indian merchants who 'came to the kingdom of Baveru [fig. L I O] [and] brought a royal peacock which they had trained to scream at the snapping of the fingers and to dance at the clapping of the hands'; the Babylonians bought it for a thousand gold coins, and paid the royal peacock high honour.

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