Download Sentence Types and Word-Order Patterns in Written Arabic: by Yishai Peled PDF

By Yishai Peled

Sentence varieties and word-order styles in Arabic were a question of discussion and controversy for a protracted time period. They have been hotly mentioned through the medieval Arab grammarians and remain an incredible subject of dialogue between glossy students. This ebook describes the improvement of the medieval grammarians' conception of sentence forms; a improvement from the speculation of 'amal, which lies on the center of medieval Arabic grammatical culture. each one significant subject is mentioned that allows you to discover the fundamental ideas underlying the medieval grammarians' arguments.Special realization is given to conceptual difficulties bobbing up from conflicts with the speculation of 'amal. this can be by way of an evaluation of the contributions made by way of smooth students to the research and outline of the structures concerned. sleek Arabists and linguists are proven to have targeting word-order styles instead of on sentence kinds, putting distinct emphasis at the practical points of observe order adaptations in Arabic.

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Extra info for Sentence Types and Word-Order Patterns in Written Arabic: Medieval and Modern Perspectives

Example text

Ibn al-Sarrāj argued that in such cases, that is, when a definite nominal is used to predicate of another definite nominal, the communicative value resides in both constituents jointly ( fī majmūʿihimā): in the sibling relationship between Zayd and the addressee, not in the constituent ʾaxūka alone. Similarly, a sentence such as Muḥ ammadun nabiyyunā (“Muḥammad is our Prophet”) is pragmatically valid only when said to non-believers; otherwise it can only be uttered as a praise which, by definition, does not have an informative value.

Translated into English as “verbal sentence” and “nominal sentence”, they are reminiscent of the corresponding concepts used by traditional linguists. But in Indo-European linguistics, for instance, “verbal sentence” denotes 23 The same applies for verbs such as māta (“die”), saqaṭa (“fall”) and fāza (“win”). g. Ibn al-Warrāq, ʿIlal, 383–384. 24 Baṭalyūsī (Ḥ ulal, 144) indicates that the mafʿūl whose fāʿil is not specified (al-mafʿūl allad̠ī lam yusammā fāʿiluhu) takes the rafʿ case when the fāʿil is not present.

Ibn Yaʿīš’s conclusion, then, is that al-jumla l-ʾūlā ka-l-mubtadaʾ wa-l-jumla l-t̠āniya ka-l-xabar (“the first clause [= the protasis] is like a mubtadaʾ and the second clause [= the apodosis] is like the xabar”). For Fārisī’s position, see p. 13 above. A similar analogy is drawn by the grammarians between ʾammā . . fasentences and conditional sentences. Zamaxšarī (Ibn Yaʿīš Šarḥ IX, 11) presents ʾammā (within his section devoted to conditional particles) as having a conditional meaning ( fīhā maʿnā l-šarṭ).

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